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    Got A COVID-19 Vaccine? Here’s what you need to do now

    Got A COVID-19 Vaccine? Here’s what you need to do now

    Vaccinating citizens aged 80 years old, health-care professionals on the frontline, and nursing home personnel and residents are granted preference by the national health service.

    Britain will be the first country in the world to deploy the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNtech in 50 hospitals on Tuesday.

    Vaccinating citizens aged 80 years old, health-care professionals on the frontline, and nursing home personnel and residents are granted preference by the national health service.

    This is what patients should expect to get the vaccine.

    When someone is vaccinated, what happens?

    The vaccine, created using a manufacturing fragment of the genetic code of the coronavirus with the latest messenger RNA technology, is inserted in the arm. Immunization has been shown in studies to defend 95 percent of recipients against COVID-19 at two doses, three weeks apart.

    Pfizer said the side effects were mild to moderate for trial participants and soon explained. Following the second dose the most significant side effects happened: nausea at 3.8% and headache at 2%. Elderly adults reported fewer and fewer adverse events.

    What Kind Of Protection Does It Give?

    Seven days after the second dose – almost one month after the initial shot – this vaccine stopped COVID-19 disease.

    Clinical studies have not yet been performed to determine whether a person with a vaccine will indeed pass the coronavirus to another person. There is safety – known as sterilization immunity – in some vaccines, including hepatitis A, but others do not. COVID-19 vaccine makers based research on whether the drug prevented the outbreak.

    The time needed to vaccinate anyone against Coronavirus infection will be many more months before it becomes apparent how much longer.

    Dr. Anita Shet, an infectious disease expert at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health said It is best to skip the bar and other personal encounters with certain people before then.

    Will the vaccine mean returning to life normally?

    Since there is little proof that immunization stops infectious infection – and no vaccination is 100% successful – scientists demand constant diligence, like carrying gloves, washing hands, and social isolation.

    “As with all vaccines, it may work really great in certain patient subsets, but not as well in others … Does that mean you are free to hop on a plane or have 30 people over at your house Probably not,” says Colorado’s UCHealth’s Senior Medical Manager, Dr. Michelle Barron.

    Explainer: I Just Got A COVID-19 Vaccine. Now What?

    Pfizer has said side effects in trial volunteers were mostly mild to moderate, and cleared up quickly.2

    Britain will become the first country in the world on Tuesday to roll out the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNtech, initially making the shot available at 50 hospitals.

    The country’s National Health Service will give priority to vaccinating people over the age of 80, frontline healthcare workers and nursing home staff and residents.

    Here is what people getting the vaccine should expect.

    What Happens When Someone Gets The Vaccine?

    The vaccine, developed with new messenger RNA technology using a manufactured fragment of the coronavirus’ genetic code, is injected into the arm. The immunization is given in two doses, three weeks apart, and has been shown in trials to protect up to 95% of recipients from contracting COVID-19.

    Pfizer has said side effects in trial volunteers were mostly mild to moderate, and cleared up quickly. The most severe side effects occurred after the second dose: fatigue in 3.8% of volunteers and headache in 2%. Older adults tended to report fewer and milder adverse events.

    What Kind Of Protection Does It Give?

    The vaccine prevented COVID-19 illness seven days after the second injection – which is about a month after the first shot.

    Clinical trials so far have not been designed to determine if an immunized person can still spread the coronavirus to someone else. Some vaccines, such as hepatitis A, do provide such protection – known as sterilizing immunity – but others do not. COVID-19 vaccine makers focused trials on determining whether the drug stopped people from getting ill.

    It will also be several more months before it becomes clear how long the vaccination will protect someone from coronavirus infection.

    “Until then, it is better to avoid the public and other in-person gatherings with many people,” said Dr. Anita Shet, infectious disease specialist at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

    Does The Vaccine Mean Back To Normal Life?

    Since there is no evidence that the immunization prevents transmission of the virus – and no vaccine is 100% effective – scientists call for continued vigilance, including mask-wearing, hand-washing, and social distancing.

    “As with all vaccines, it may work really great in certain patient subsets, but not as well in others … Does that mean you are free to hop on a plane or have 30 people over at your house? Probably not,” said Dr. Michelle Barron, senior medical director for infection prevention at Colorado’s UCHealth.

    She said vaccination campaigns are unlikely to reach “a critical mass” until next spring or early summer.

    Got A COVID-19 Vaccine? Here’s what you need to do now

    Rajat Singhhttps://bioinformaticsindia.com
    A Bioinformatics Masters degree from the G.N Khalsa Science and Commerce College (Mumbai). Blogger by choice and an enthusiastic person with a technical background and passion.

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